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Brief results for your search of "Sociology" yielded 4 records.

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1. Title:African-American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920 [ Full Record ]
URL:http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award97/ohshtml/aaeohome.html
Description:This selection of manuscript and printed text and images drawn from the collections of the Ohio Historical Society illuminates the history of black Ohio from 1850 to 1920, a story of slavery and freedom, segregation and integration, religion and politics, migrations and restrictions, harmony and discord, and struggles and successes.

Individuals and institutions from Ohio played important roles in the struggle against slavery, providing access to higher education for African Americans, and advocating civil rights. In his Introduction to the collection on the Ohio Historical Society web site, Dr. John Fleming of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center highlights the significance of particular portions of the collection. -- from the Website.

Language:|English|



2. Title:Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: U.S. Congressional Documents and Debates, 1774-1873 [ Full Record ]
URL:http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/amlaw/lawhome.html
Description:A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation consists of a linked set of published congressional records of the United States of America from the Continental Congress through the 42nd Congress. The online collection offers the records of the Continental Congress, the Constitutional Convention and ratification debates, and the first forty-two federal congresses, 1774-1873. It includes the Journals of the Continental Congress (1774-1789), the Records of the Federal Convention of 1787, and the Debates in the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution (1787-1788); the Journals of the House of Representatives (1789-1873) and the Senate (1789-1873), including the Senate Executive Journal (1789-1873); the Journal of William Maclay (1789-1791), senator from Pennsylvania in the 1st Congress; the debates of Congress as published in the Annals of Congress (1789-1824), the Register of Debates (1824-1837), and The Congressional Globe(1833-1873); and the Statutes at Large (1789-1873). Seventeen volumes of the U.S. Serial Set are also currently available; an additional 93 volumes from before 1873 will be added later.

This online collection offers the records of the U.S. Congress up to 1873, the year in which the Government Printing Office assumed publication of the proceedings of Congress and the Congressional Record began. Future additions to the online collection will include congressional bills from 1789 to 1873 and the American State Papers, which contain the legislative and executive documents published by Congress from 1789 to 1838.

Bibliographic citation styles: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpedu/cite.html

Language:|English|



3. Title:Colonial Connecticut Records (CCR): The Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut, 1636-1776 [ Full Record ]
URL:http://www.colonialct.uconn.edu/
Description:Colonial Connecticut Records (CCR) is a digital collection created by staff at the University of Connecticut Libraries and supported generously by the Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center. The project aims to bring the colonial history of Connecticut alive and more accessible to users worldwide by the online delivery of the complete, digitized volumes of the Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut, 1636-1776. CCR includes volumes 1 through 15 of the Public Records, which were digitized from microfilmed copies of the original publications owned by the Libraries.
Language:|English|



4. Title:Emma Spaulding Bryant Letters - Duke University Special Collections Library [ Full Record ]
URL:http://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/scriptorium/bryant/
Description:Emma Spaulding Bryant wrote these ten letters to her husband, John Emory Bryant, in the summer of 1873. They recount Emma's activities during that summer when she and her daughter, Alice, were visiting relatives in Illinois and Ohio while her husband tended to his political affairs in Georgia. In particular, the letters describe Emma's visits to a doctor in Cleveland for "uterine difficulties" that had been ailing her for some time. Although we do not have her husband's letters to her from this period, it appears that he accused her of adultery with the doctor and berated her for not being obedient to him. Many of Emma's letters from this period have markings in red pencil, presumably made by John to highlight the sections of her letters that he found suspicious. Emma's responses to John's accusations are indignant, and she rebuts each of his points eloquently and emphatically. Because these letters are unusually frank for this time period, they reveal much about the relationships between husbands and wives in this era, and shed light on medical practices that were often kept privateĀ….

Emma Spaulding Bryant's letters are found in the John Emory Bryant Papers at the Duke University Special Collections Library. This collection contains correspondence, published writings, and other papers relating to John Bryant's Civil War service with the 8th Maine Volunteers, his activities as agent of the Freedmen's Bureau and leader of the Negro Republicans in Georgia, and his interest in temperance and the Methodist Church. It also contains many letters from Emma Spaulding Bryant and two volumes of journals kept by her, as well as an autobiographical sketch by their daughter Alice." from the Website" WRAP=virtual>Emma Spaulding Bryant's letters are found in the John Emory Bryant Papers at the Duke University Special Collections Library. This collection contains correspondence, published writings, and other papers relating to John Bryant's Civil War service with the 8th Maine Volunteers, his activities as agent of the Freedmen's Bureau and leader of the Negro Republicans in Georgia, and his interest in temperance and the Methodist Church. It also contains many letters from Emma Spaulding Bryant and two volumes of journals kept by her, as well as an autobiographical sketch by their daughter Alice." from the Website" WRAP=virtual>Emma Spaulding Bryant wrote these ten letters to her husband, John Emory Bryant, in the summer of 1873. They recount Emma's activities during that summer when she and her daughter, Alice, were visiting relatives in Illinois and Ohio while her husband tended to his political affairs in Georgia. In particular, the letters describe Emma's visits to a doctor in Cleveland for "uterine difficulties" that had been ailing her for some time. Although we do not have her husband's letters to her from this period, it appears that he accused her of adultery with the doctor and berated her for not being obedient to him. Many of Emma's letters from this period have markings in red pencil, presumably made by John to highlight the sections of her letters that he found suspicious. Emma's responses to John's accusations are indignant, and she rebuts each of his points eloquently and emphatically. Because these letters are unusually frank for this time period, they reveal much about the relationships between husbands and wives in this era, and shed light on medical practices that were often kept privateĀ….

Emma Spaulding Bryant's letters are found in the John Emory Bryant Papers at the Duke University Special Collections Library. This collection contains correspondence, published writings, and other papers relating to John Bryant's Civil War service with the 8th Maine Volunteers, his activities as agent of the Freedmen's Bureau and leader of the Negro Republicans in Georgia, and his interest in temperance and the Methodist Church. It also contains many letters from Emma Spaulding Bryant and two volumes of journals kept by her, as well as an autobiographical sketch by their daughter Alice." from the Website

Language:|English|